Friday, September 4, 2009

Venus and Various Volitional Ventures

Learning about Venus:
This butter volcano demonstrated how lava is liquid when it's really hot and hardens as it cools. The pipe cleaner ball is Larkin's model of Venus.
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To learn about radar, the kids shaped clay into hills and valleys in a box then covered it with foil, which was marked with a grid. I gave them a piece of paper that had a matching grid and a stick marked in increments with different colored paint. They poked the stick through the foil and observed how far down it went by noting the color that was at the level of the foil. Then they recorded the color on their chart. This gave them an idea of where the high and low spots were without being able to see inside the box.
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Then they decided to make aliens out of the rest of the clay.
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Notebook pages: pictures of the surface of Venus made with paint and pastels, mini-books from JFeliciano. I tried to add a little variety with the vocabulary by making it into a crossword puzzle.
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Miah's Venus Page
Venus has volcanoes. It has lots and lots of lava. Venus has lots of atmosphere around it. Scientists thought Venus was a twin to earth. It isn't because Venus has lots of lava and volcanoes. Scientists used radar to go out to space to find out if that part has land or not. Venus has phases like the moon.

Larkin's Hot Venus
Venus has lots of lava. Venus has lots of volcanoes. Venus has dried up lava. Venus has lots of clouds around it. The sun rises in the west. The sun sets in the east. A spacecraft took pictures of Venus. Venus orbits around the sun. It rotates. It's the hottest planet. The Romans named Venus after their false goddess.

Did you catch that bit about the sun rising in the west? Venus rotates in the opposite direction of earth and most other planets - evidence against the big bang theory.

Meanwhile, back on earth. . .
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A common nighthawk. I've seen these before but only one at a time. These were flying through in a very loose flock, three or four spread out coming every minute or two, headed south.

Black swallowtail caterpillars. Crazy girl faces. Whittling. Toddler painting.
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"Do not let the children pass a day without distinct efforts, intellectual, moral, volitional; let them brace themselves to understand; let them compel themselves to do and to bear; and let them do right at the sacrifice of ease and pleasure: and this for many higher reasons, but, in the first and lowest place, that the mere physical organ of mind and will may grow vigorous with work. . . Just as important is it that the brain should have due rest; that is, should rest and work alternately." -Charlotte Mason (Home Education, p.22)

2 comments:

  1. G-R-E-A-T!! I love that aliens!

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  2. Your lessons are always AMAZING to me. I love the stick in the foil activity...everything is so hands on. Hope you guys are well. Grandma B reads your blog daily (you probably know this) and loves looking at your pictures. How great is a blog when a Great Grandma in Minnesota can keep tabs on her grandkids a few states away?!!

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